Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim Exemplifies Beauford Delaney’s Masterful Portraits

Beauford Delaney (1901-1979) “Portraitist of the Famous

“Perhaps I should say, flatly, what I believe–that he is a great painter, among the very greatest; but I do know that great art can only be created out of love, and that no greater lover has ever held a brush.”

James Baldwin (1924-1987), writer,
friend of artist Beauford Delaney

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971oil on canvas

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971

Beauford Delaney, hailed as the most important African-American artists of the 20th century, whose life appeared to symbolize the mythical artistic existence of privation and relative obscurity, that show a retrospective of “uninhibited colorist (though never an unintelligent one)” that is “apotheosized” and whose talent and “free, open and outgoing nature” engendered admiration from everyone whom was fortunate enough to encounter him as he was THE darling of the international culture scene in New York and Paris. James Baldwin called him his “spiritual father.”

Remembering THE Greatest artists of the 20th century, the ‘amazing and invariable’ Beauford Delaney, the “Portraitist of the Famous”, who’s masterpieces are trumpeted as cutting-edge work in Black aesthetics, stylistic evolution from representation to pure abstraction, with new and radical theories with his techniques and expression of the politics of Black arts, affording him his very own, singular serious stature among abstract expressionists, transforming the critical landscape into a growing interest in his creation of “Black Abstraction”!

For more than a decade, Delaney showed compelling, vibrant images of energetic life: produced engaging abstract works, portraits, landscapes, and abstractions celebrated for their brilliance and technical complexity with his dramatic stylistic shift from figurative compositions of life to abstract expressionist studies of color and light, powerful works of art and culture, illuminate some of Delaney’s most innovative years and firmly place his work among the dominant art movements of the day.

The fascinating Beauford Delaney is a Modern artist who produced engaging portraits, landscapes, and abstractions celebrated for their brilliance and technical complexity with his dramatic stylistic shift from figurative compositions of New York life to abstract expressionist studies of color and light following his move to Paris in 1953, illuminate some of Delaney’s most innovative years and firmly place his work among the dominant art movements of the day! 

The career of Beauford Delaney (1901-79) was mainly working with Expressionism, Harlem Renaissance who’s first exhibition was New Names In American Art: Recent Contributions To Painting And Sculpture By Negro Artists at The Renaissance Society in Chicago, IL in 1944, and the most recent exhibition was Art Basel Miami Beach 2020 – online viewing only at Art Basel Miami Beach in Miami Beach, FL in 2020. Beauford Delaney is mostly exhibited in United States, but also had exhibitions in Germany, United Kingdom and elsewhere. Delaney has 10 solo shows and 79 group shows over the last 76 years (for more information, see biography). Delaney has also been in 7 art fairs but in no biennials. The most important show was Beauford Delaney: From New York to Paris at Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia, PA in 2005. Other important shows were at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, MN and The Studio Museum in Harlem in New York City, NY. Beauford Delaney has been exhibited with Norman Lewis and Romare Bearden. Beauford Delaney’s art is in 9 museum collections, at France at the Museum of Modern Art , École des Beaux-Arts, Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, NY and The Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, IL, featured in Jet and Playboy magazines among others.

Beauford Delaney is ranked among the Top 10 globally, and in United States. Delaney’s best rank was in 1944, the artist’s rank has improved over the last 5 years, with the most dramatic change in 1992. 

Many of its prominent figures, who admiringly looked upon Delaney as their “Shaman” or “Yogi” and fondly referred to him as a “Black Buddha”, were described by his close friend, James Baldwin, as a “cross between Brer Rabbit and St. Francis of Assisi.” 

His list of friends and acquaintances including artists, World Leaders, politicians, activist, authors/poets/writers, intellectuals, filmmakers, promoted by numerous patrons of the arts, world Cultural Ambassadors, art gallery owners, befriended by notable figures, and musicians Stuart Davis — his closest painter compatriot — W.E.B. Du Bois (whose portrait he painted), Salvadore Dalí (whose portrait he painted), Countee Cullen, Louis Armstrong (whose portrait he painted), Duke Ellington (whose portrait he painted), Ethel Waters (whose portraits he painted), W.C. Handy (whose portrait he painted), Henry Miller (who wrote a tribute to him), John F. Kennedy (whose portraits he painted), Robert Kennedy (whose portraits he painted), Jean-Claude Killy (whose portraits he painted), Herb Gentry, Alain Locke, Cy Twombly, Sterling Brown,  Langston Hughes, Georgia O’Keeffe (who drew charcoal and pastel portraits of Delaney in 1943), Augusta Savage, Stuart Davis, John Marin, Pablo Picasso (whose portrait he painted), Richard A. Long (whose portrait he painted), John Koenig (whose portrait he painted), and Claude McKay were connected to Paris in various ways. 

Also significant is the impact of jazz, as exemplified by the avante garde “free jazz” music explosion of Ornettte Coleman, Archie Shepp, Cecil Taylor, Frank Wright, Bobby Few, Bill Dixon, François Cotinaud, Sunny Murray, Barney Wilen, Globe Unity Orchestra, Andrew Hill, Dave Burrell, Anthony Braxton, Leroy Jenkins, Grachan Moncur III, Malachi Favors, Claude Delcloo, Beb Guérin, Kenneth Terroade, Bernard Vitet, Lester Bowie, Jerome Cooper, Joseph Jarman, Joachim Kühn, Steve Lacy, Roscoe Mitchell, Robin Kenyatta, Michel Portal, Irène Aebi, Ronnie Beer, Kent Carter, Dieter Gewissler, Oliver Johnson, Famoudou Don Moye, Alan Shorter, Bernard Vitet, Jouk Minor, Byard Lancaster, Kenneth Terroade, Paul Jeffrey, Ronnie Beer, Sonny Sharrock, Pharoah Sanders, Black Harold, Johnny Dyani, Gary Windo, Rene Augustus, Joseph Déjean, Beb Guérin, Claude Delcoo, Clifford Thornton, Wayne Shorter, Sun Ra and His Intergalactic Research Arkestra, François Tusques, Alan Silva and the Celestrial Communication Orchestra.

Luminaries Josephine Baker, Bob Blackburn, Ed Clark, Bob Thompson, Marian Anderson (whose portrait he painted), Jacob Lawrence, Ella Fitzgerald (whose portrait he painted), Zora Neale Hurston, Alfred Stieglitz, Carl Van Vechten, Edward Steichen, Dorothy Norman, Anaïs Nin, art studio owner Charles Alston, Jackson Pollock, Vassili Pikoula, Henri Chahine (whose portrait he painted), Charlie Parker (whose portrait and music he painted.), James Jones, Jean Genet, Lawrence Calcagno, Cab Calloway, Elaine DeKooning, Palmer C. Hayden (whose portrait he painted), art dealer Darthea Speyer (whose portrait he painted) who had exhibitions of Delaney’s art at Paris’ Galerie Lambert in 1964. Others include artists Charles Boggs, Al Hirschfeld, John Franklin Koenig, Harold Cousins, Herbert Gentry (whose portrait he painted), Ed Clark, and Ellis Wilson, authors James Jones and Henry Miller (who was also a water colorist), Writers Richard Wright, Surrealist poet Stanislas Rodanski, Chester Himes, Ralph Ellison, William Gardner Smith, Richard Gibson, Lorraine Hansberry, Ted Joans, art historian Richard A. Long, and his friend Lynn Stone.

Delaney became close friends with another influential visual artist, Lawrence Calcagno. A white, abstract landscape artist from Northern California, it was an unlikely pairing when the two met in Paris. Yet the two men grew to share a close artistic bond, tied by their shared belief in the spiritual nature of painting and abstraction. They also became close personal friends, writing hundreds of letters to each other over Delaney’s later years, after Calcagno left Paris to return to America. In these letters, Delaney is at his most vulnerable and open, as he felt with a kindred spirit.

His closest lifelong friend, however, was James Baldwin — who, while fleeing a strict father at 16, looked up Delaney in the Village. He later called the artist his “principal witness.” Delaney was a kind of surrogate nurturing father to the writer. Judging by his 1941 Dark Rapture (James Baldwin), a steamy nude portrait of the 16-year-old writer (as well as from subsequent Baldwin portraits over the decades), Delaney seems to have been in love with the lithe young man 22 years his junior.

Indeed, while Delaney had not intended to settle permanently in Europe, he quickly realized he had found there a more hospitable climate in which to pursue his craft. Asked about his experience as an expatriate he replied, “Expatriate? It appears to me that in order to be an expatriate one has to be, in some manner, driven from one’s fatherland, from one’s native land. When I left the United States during the 1950s no such condition was left behind. One must belong before one may then not belong. I belong here in Paris, I am able to realize myself here. I am no expatriate.”

While Paris had in some sense liberated Delaney, there were sorrows he could not escape. “There always seems to be the shadow,” Delaney wrote to a benefactor, “which follows the light.” Although he was referring to the financial difficulties that plagued him throughout his career, the artist could also have been talking about his struggles with mental illness, which manifested as psychotic breaks and ghostly voices in his head, resulting in his confinement to a mental hospital at the end of his life. While Delaney was a mentor to Baldwin during the author’s early years, Baldwin later became Delaney’s protector, assisting him financially and emotionally. For an introduction to an exhibition in Paris in 1964 Baldwin wrote, “Perhaps I am so struck by the light in Beauford’s paintings because he comes from darkness—as I do, as, in fact, we all do.” The vibrant luminosity of Composition 16 is but one example of Delaney’s lifelong quest to find light in that darkness.

Many felt him to be the “Dean of African American Artists Living in Europe.” Although he never fully wanted this distinction most of Delaney’s works were close to being classified as abstract art. Beauford Delaney died in Paris at age 78 on March 26, 1979.

Delaney lived and worked in Paris for many years and much of his work was neglected until a retrospective in 1978 at the Studio Museum in Harlem.  During his absence, the French government, in an effort to collect delinquent accounts, sealed off his apartment and prepared to auction off his products of nearly a forty year career.  Many of his works were stolen and some had to be recovered by European Intelligence, the CIA/FBI. Had the works been sold, dispersed throughout Europe, the neglect may have been irreversible.

The painter Beauford Delaney (Knoxville 1901-1979 Paris) was lost to history for a time. Yet in the mid-twentieth century, Delaney was considered an important artist of his generation.

Following his death, he was praised as a great and neglected painter but, with a few notable exceptions, the neglect continued.

A retrospective of his work at the Studio Museum in Harlem a year before his death did little to revive interest in his work. It was not until the 1988 exhibition Beauford Delaney: From Tennessee to Paris, curated by the French art dealer Philippe Briet at the Philippe Briet Gallery, that Delaney’s work was again exhibited in New York, followed by two retrospectives in the gallery: “Beauford Delaney: A Retrospective [50 Years of Light]” in 1991, and “Beauford Delaney: The New York Years [1929–1953]” in 1994.

Delaney disappeared from collective memory partly due to the racial bias of art history, which, among other things, meant that even while he was celebrated, it was less as a painter equal to his contemporaries than as some kind of Negro seer or spiritual black Buddha wherein he could not escape the long American night of racism. 

“Whatever Happened to Beauford Delaney?”, an article by Eleanor Heartney, appeared in Art in America in response to the 1994 exhibition asking why this once well regarded “artist’s artist” was now virtually unknown to the American art public. “What happened? Is this another case of an over-inflated reputation returning to its true level? Or was Delaney undone by changing fashions which rendered his work unpalatable to succeeding generations? Why did Beauford Delaney so completely disappear from American art history?” The author believed that Delaney’s disappearance from the consciousness of the New York art world was linked to “his move to Paris at a crucial moment in the consolidation of New York’s position as the world’s cultural capital and his work’s irrelevance to the history of American art as it was being written by critics” at the time. The article concludes, “Today [1994] as those histories unravel and are replaced by narratives with a more varied and colorful weave, artists like Delaney can be seen in a new light.”

In 1985 James Baldwin described the impact of Delaney on his life, saying he was “the first living proof, for me, that a black man could be an artist. In a warmer time, a less blasphemous place, he would have been recognized as my Master and I as his Pupil. He became, for me, an example of courage and integrity, humility and passion. An absolute integrity: I saw him shaken many times and I lived to see him broken but I never saw him bow.” Baldwin marveled over Delaney’s ability to emulate such light in his work despite the darkness he was surrounded by for the majority of his life. It is this insight of Delaney’s past, Baldwin believes, that serves as evidence for the true victory Delaney secured. Baldwin admired his keen ability to “lead the inner and the outer eye, directly and inexorably, to a new confrontation with reality.” He further wrote, “Perhaps I should not say, flatly, what I believe – that he is a great painter – among the very greatest; but I do know that great art can only be created out of love, and that no greater lover has ever held a brush.”

His work is sold in galleries for increasingly high prices, and his paintings hang prominently among modernist and postwar works in New York’s Museum of Modern Art [where his yellow Composition 16 (1954-56) was hung next to a work by Mark Rothko], the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum, and the National Portrait Gallery (notably a portrait of Baldwin). The American artist Glenn Ligon curated a 2015 exhibition at the Tate Liverpool titled Glenn Ligon: Encounters and Collisions” that featured two works by Delaney (one a portrait of Baldwin) and put Delaney in the company of the Abstract Expressionists, next to a picture by Franz Kline.

Because his estate has been largely closed to scholars to the present day, and because his reputation waned after his death, critical writing about Delaney is almost nonexistent, even with the flourishing of Baldwin studies across disciplines. 

The Studio Museum of Harlem broke ground with the first major posthumous exhibition of Delaney on US soil with Beauford Delaney: A Retrospective (1979) and included the full text of Baldwin’s previously published essay “Introduction to Exhibition of Beauford Delaney Opening December 4, 1964 at the Gallery Lambert.” There have been other exhibitions of Delaney’s work since 2000 that include Baldwin in minor ways and whose catalogues have provided most of the critical work done recently on Delaney to date: these include Beauford Delaney: Liquid Light: Paris Abstractions 1954-1970, organized by Michael Rosenfeld Gallery in 1999; Beauford Delaney’ at the Sert Gallery of the Harvard University Art Museums;  An Artistic Friendship: Beauford Delaney and Lawrence Calcagno at the Palmer Museum of Art at the Pennsylvania State University in 2001; The Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA; Beauford Delaney: The Color Yellow, organized by the High Museum of Art in 2002 and curated by Richard J. Powell, who contributed a groundbreaking essay about Delaney’s use of color; Beauford Delaney: New York to Paris (2005), organized by the Minneapolis Institute of Art, whose robust catalog features several scholarly essays mentioning James Baldwin; Beauford Delaney: Renaissance of Form and Vibration of Color (2016) at Montparnasse’s Reid Hall and sponsored by Wells International Foundation and Les Amis de Beauford Delaney, along with Columbia Global Centers/Reid Hall Exposition; and Gathering Light: Works by Beauford Delaney (2017) at the Knoxville Museum of Art in Tennessee. Aside from the catalogue essays from these and other exhibitions, the only monograph devoted to Delaney is the 1998 biography by David Leeming, Amazing Grace: A Life of Beauford Delaney (1998). Leeming outlines the broad arc of Delaney’s life and artistic development while emphasizing the contrast between the artist’s vibrant social life and troubled inner life that led to his institutionalization in the late 1970s. It is encouraging to see, however, that references to Delaney are now appearing in cutting-edge work on Black aesthetics, such as Fred Moten’s theoretical work, and in reconstructions of LGBTQIA arts.

While previous Delaney exhibitions and publications have almost exclusively emphasized Delaney’s stylistic evolution from the 1940s to the 1960s, from representation to pure abstraction, as a function of his move from New York to Paris and/or his worsening mental health, the proposed symposium will put Delany into conversation with new and radical theories about the techniques and politics of Black arts, affording him some of the first serious treatment by academic criticism to date. Because of Delaney’s stature among abstract expressionists, the project will contribute to a growing interest in the past ten years concerning “Black Abstraction” in the arts, as evidence by shows at the Michael Rosenfeld Gallery (2014), the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston (2014), Pace Gallery (2016), Anita Shapolsky Gallery and the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. (2018). It is time to bring Delaney also into the sphere of queer theory, new Black aesthetics, and new theories of Black care that are transforming the critical landscape in academe and in which Baldwin is now frequently found.

But his life ended very much like it began. Even after the fame and notoriety, he was still a poor, black man with many struggles. Just like his art, Delaney’s life was filled with light and darkness. Highs and lows.

If you were to picture a counter-image to help balance that perception in one person, you could hardly do better than Beauford Delaney. He was black, he was gay, he was unpredictable, he was charismatic. He was an intellectual, and he was an artist, in fact a wildly colorful, creative and unpredictable abstract expressionist. He was cosmopolitan, connected to the world beyond, and adored in Paris and New York, where his paintings, some of them famous and very expensive, have been exhibited, even recently. 

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971

oil on Canvas

25 1/2″ x 21 3/8″ / 64.8 x 54.3 cm 

signed verso with Beauford Delaney Estate stamp

PROVENANCE

Beauford Delaney, Paris, France

Estate of Beauford Delaney, Knoxville, TN

Dr. Ravindra Varma Dantuluri, Knoxville, TN

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY

PUBLICATION HISTORY

Beauford Delaney. Paris: Galerie Darthea Speyer, 1973. Exhibition catalogue.

Illustrated in black-and-white in a photograph with the artist in his studio, n.p.

Beauford Delaney: A Retrospective, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY, April 9 – July 2, 1978;

Museum of National Center for Afro-American Artists, Dorchester, MA, October 8 – November 4, 1978

Illustrated in black-and-white in a photograph with the artist in his studio and listed on the checklist as no. 13, n.p. (titled Portrait of a Man)

NOTE

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim (c.1971) exemplifies Beauford Delaney’s masterful portraits in which he uses bold, contrasting color to express an arresting psychological and emotional likeness. With his signature yellow palette and expressive brushstroke, Delaney portrays his friend Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim.

Throughout his career, Beauford Delaney executed modernist and psychologically compelling portraits of friends,  acquaintances and patrons. Portraits of those he knew intimately, tended to be the most compelling and profound. Generally, Delaney’s portrait paintings tend to be modernist, melding representation with abstraction, sharing a strong affinity with the gestural luminous abstractions that dominated Delaney’s oeuvre after 1953. Even after Delaney evolved into an abstract expressionist painter upon his move to France in September 1953, he continued to paint portraits that were much more than straightforward depictions of his sitters. While the composition was defined by the subject, he executed modernist canvases defined by his relatively monochromatic fields of color and distinctive brushwork. Like Delaney’s landscapes, cityscapes and interiors of his Greene Street period of the 1940s and early 1950s, the faces, bodies and backgrounds of his portraits were vehicles for his personal language of abstraction. Art historian Richard J. Powell writes:

“In addition to his artistic commitment to abstraction, experimenting with painted surfaces in oil pigments, and delving into the visual effects and relational possibilities of color, Beauford Delaney was equally bound to an art of portraiture. The genre that first brought Delaney critical notice and a measure of success, portraiture exemplified his genuine love of people – all kinds of people – and his fascination with their outward appearances, personalities, minds, and auras. As seen in almost every early photograph of Delaney – whether in his crowded Greene Street studio or sitting alongside his work at the Annual Washington Square Art Fair – portraits largely defined his as an artist. Yet…portraiture was also a vehicle for sorting out an array of primarily visual issues: concerns of color and form that could easily be coupled with his painting a friend’s likeness or an esteemed individual’s spirit.”*2

Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim recalls meeting Beauford Delaney and sitting for his portrait in Paris in 1971, when al-Hakim was around twenty years old. al-Hakim was born Randy Wallace before converting to Islam and changing his name. 

Beauford Delaney and Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim with Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim (c.1971), Jean Genet with Jean Genet in the upper right and Bobby Kennedy a little lower behind my left shoulder. Above Portrait is his “Little Totem of Light”, ca. 1966

Beauford Delaney and Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim with Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim (c.1971), 1971

Curator Patricia Sue Canterbury writes of Delaney’s portraits of the 1960s:

“Delaney’s portraiture during the 1960s, although often regarded as a departure from the artist’s abstract explorations of light, was actually an extension of the same. As he had reassured viewers at the opening of his solo show at the Galerie Lambert in late 1964, abstraction and portraiture ‘were studies in light revealed – the light that have meaning to the individuals depicted…and the light considered directly as contained…in the abstract paintings.’ As the decade progressed, however, it is clear that any boundaries perceived between the two became increasingly blurred. Solid forms within the portraits dematerialized and the subject and the enveloping atmosphere seemingly shared the same atomic structure.”*2

Powell writes of Delaney’s use of a yellow palette:

“Delaney’s artistic preoccupation with the color yellow is governed by its capacity to illuminate a world in which poverty, inhumanity, lovelessness, mediocrity, and darkness threaten his soul and being. No stranger to assaults on the body and psyche, Delaney sought in his work and throughout his entire life to experience that state of perfect bliss in nature and society, to reach that nearly unattainable note or apogee of emotional discernment in the arts, and to know that ecstatic feeling of an ‘excessive and deliberate joy’ in life. Oddly enough, by placing himself and his audience in his dense and luxurious yellow zone, he realized these grand ambitions.”*3

Beauford Delaney in his studio and Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim (c.1971) can be seen above Delaney

Photograph of Beauford Delaney in his studio as reproduced in the catalogue for the exhibition Beauford Delaney, Galerie Darthea Speyer, Paris, France, February 6 – March 2, 1973; Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim (c.1971) can be seen above Delaney to the right

Portraits by Beauford Delaney are in numerous museum collections including:

The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL;

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA;

Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA;

Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI;

Knoxville Museum of Art, Knoxville, TN;

Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester, NY;

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY;

The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY;

The National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC;

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA;

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA;

SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah, GA;

The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY; 

Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, TN;

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA;

Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC;

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY;

Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA.

Footnotes:

  *1-Richard J. Powell, “The Color of Ecstasy,” Beauford Delaney: The Color Yellow (Atlanta: The High Museum of Art, 2002), 20-21

 *2-Patricia Sue Canterbury, “Transatlantic Transformations: Beauford Delaney in Paris,” Beauford Delaney: From New York To Paris exh. cat. (Minneapolis: Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 2004), 65

 *3-Powell, 29-30 Powell, 29-30

Harlem Renaissance Modernist Beauford Delaney, GREATEST Artist in African-American Art History

“In another religion they honor people who serve like you with Sainthood!”” – Economics Professor Adeel Malik,Oxford University, England and World Renowned News Expert Commentator, speaking about Abdul-Jalil and the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation.

“GOD sent me an ANGEL!”” – Hammer, speaking about Abdul-Jalil.
“Jalil, YOU ARE A TZADIK (SAINT)!”– Barry Barkan, Live Oak Institute and

  Ashoka Fellow at Ashoka Foundation:Innovators for the Public

“I thank God for you and for bringing you into my life and for the ministry you have been given to help the people of God!”– Pastor L. J. Jennings, Kingdom Builders Christian Fellowship, speaking about Abdul-Jalil and AMWF

Jalil with of his Rolls Royces
Jalil with 1 of his Rolls Royces
Beauford Delaney’s Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim, c.1971
Beauford Delaney, Self-portrait, 1944
Beauford Delaney, Self-portrait, 1944. Photo: Estate of Beauford Delaney by permission of Derek L. Spratley, Esquire, Court Appointed Administrator; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY Beauford Delaney was an American Harlem Renaissance painter known for his colorful Modernist compositions and distinctive approach to figuration. One of the most important African-American artists of the early 20th century, he often painted New York street scenes, lively scenes in jazz clubs, and portraits of prominent black figures like James Baldwin and W.E.B. Du Bois. Can Fire in the Park (1946) is one of his most iconic images, movingly capturing a common occurrence in Depression-era New York life. In addition to his representational work, Delaney also painted abstractly, noting that “the abstraction, ostensibly, is simply for me the penetration of something that is more profound in many ways than the rigidity of a form,” he explained. “A form if it breaths some, if it has some enigma to it, it is also the enigma that is the abstract, I would think.” Born on December 30, 1901 in Knoxville, TN as one of 10 children, he worked as sign-post painter as a teenager before going on to study in Boston at the Massachusetts Normal School, the South Boston School of Art, and the Copley Society. After school, he moved to Harlem in New York, where he befriended fellow artists like Alfred Stieglitz, Stuart Davis, who introduced him to the work of Modernists like Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and others. He moved to Europe in 1953 but was unable to find the same success he had previously had in New York, and gradually succumbed to alcoholism and mental health problems before his death on March 26, 1979 in Paris, France. Today, Delaney’s works are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among others. Fame, at least lasting fame — the your-work-goes-down-in-history kind, often accompanied by fat royalty payments — is a club that thinks of itself as an unbiased meritocracy, blind to everything but aesthetic innovation and popular success. It’s never quite worked out that way. When we look at the past, we still see generations of great talents who never quite got their due critically or commercially, many of them left relatively unsung. In this ongoing series, our critics pick artists they feel remain underappreciated and tell their stories and sing their praises. “He is amazing … this Beauford,” the novelist Henry Miller wrote of his lifelong friend Beauford Delaney in a 1945 essay that helped make the painter (whom Miller called a “black monarch” capable of making “the great white world … grow smaller”) a legendary attraction in Greenwich Village. So much so that people often gathered outside Delaney’s building at 181 Greene Street, where he lived and worked on the top floor — a walk-up lit only by a wood-burning potbellied stove. Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1901, Delaney migrated north to Boston in 1923 to study art, then moved to New York in November 1929, days after the onset of the Great Depression. That first day in New York, he slept on a Union Square bench, where someone stole his shoes. The next morning, he set out on foot, in newly bought shoes, to walk uptown to Harlem. When he reached Central Park, he stopped because of his severely blistered feet.
Abdul-Jalil Portrait by Beauford Delaney, in 1971. Portrait of Jean Genet in backgroud, top right, Kennedy right behind Jalil
Things had never been tougher for American artists — let alone black ones. Art schools didn’t take black artists, and independent-studio classes banned black artists from figure-drawing sessions with white models. Undaunted, Delaney began drawing at a midtown dance studio. Somehow, his career took off almost overnight. Four months after he arrived in New York, an article appeared in the New York Telegraph about portraits Delaney had done of dancers and society figures.

Beauford Delaney

Artist (1901–79) Currently, MoMA has

“Composition 16”

(1954–56) on view, a glowing bioluminescent yellow abstraction kitty-corner across the gallery from that other (until recently) missing modernist, Hilma af Klint. Both are in the company of de Kooning, Kline, and the other giants of mid-century painting. He met and charmed everyone. A list of his friends and acquaintances includes Stuart Davis — his closest painter compatriot — W.E.B. Du Bois (whose portrait he did), Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Jacob Lawrence, Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O’Keeffe (who did a portrait of him), Edward Steichen, Dorothy Norman, Anaïs Nin (who intimidated him), Jackson Pollock, and Jean Genet. His closest lifelong friend, however, was James Baldwin — who, while fleeing a strict father at 16, looked up Delaney in the Village. He later called the artist his “principal witness.” Delaney was a kind of surrogate nurturing father to the writer. Judging by his 1941 Dark Rapture (James Baldwin), a steamy nude portrait of the 16-year-old writer (as well as from subsequent Baldwin portraits over the decades), Delaney seems to have been in love with the lithe young man 22 years his junior. In October 1938, more than a decade before Pollock graced the same pages, Life magazine featured Delaney, picturing him beatifically smiling at the Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibit. The caption read, “One of the most talented Negro painters.” Yet by the time he died in 1979, Delaney was alone, alcoholic, hallucinating, paranoid, and penniless in a Paris psychiatric hospital. What started as a great American story is now a near absence in the history of American art and an American Dream forestalled.
Beauford Delaney (1901–1979), Dark Rapture (James Baldwin), 1941
A 1941 portrait of James Baldwin by the artist Beauford Delaney. Photo: Beauford Delaney (1901–1979), Dark Rapture (James Baldwin), 1941, oil on Masonite, 34” x 28”, signed; © Estate of Beauford Delaney by permission of Derek L. Spratley, Esquire, Court Appointed Administrator; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY I love his work — especially his highly colored, optically intense, dense figurative paintings. He is almost an exact contemporary of, and the New York counterpart to, another great painter-portraitist, an artist who captured the power and magic of being poor stylishly, who lived on the margins but eventually came to be recognized as a visionary: Alice Neel. Delaney should be regarded as such as well. Through the 1930s and 1940s, while most American artists were either being fifth-rate Cubists, regionalists, or academics or desperately looking for ways around Picasso via Surrealism, Delaney made his own thoroughly contemporary way. In street and park scenes, still lifes, and portraits, he built upon the work of his good friend Davis, arriving at his own compact, flat fields of creamy, opaque color. His sense of visual, jigsawing geometry and strong, graphic distillation of structure is second only to Davis’s. Delaney’s work, however, has a much more human aura, atmosphere, and arc, almost to a mystical degree, seen only in Marsden Hartley. So why has Delaney been disappeared from collective memory? Partly, it is the racial bias of art history, which, among other things, meant that even while he was celebrated, it was less as a painterly equal to his contemporaries than as some kind of Negro seer or spiritual black Buddha. And in 1953, at the age of 51, Delaney left New York at perhaps the worst possible time. When other American artists, like Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, John Cage, and Merce Cunningham, were meeting and staying up late together (many of them open and uncloseted in their sexuality), Delaney was in Paris, where Baldwin had told him he could escape the long American night of racism. Baldwin was right, but Delaney struggled with French and became even more isolated. Twombly, Baldwin, and Miller returned often to New York, while Delaney never did. So he never got to rejoin the conversation. By the 1960s, Delaney’s abstraction was more connected to the French Art Informel — a primarily European response to Abstract Expressionism — and his paintings, influenced as they were by Monet’s Water Lilies and Turner’s glowing color, had few of the ironic, systemic, direct qualities of Pop Art and minimalism. At a distance, Delaney’s work seemed passé — an artist painting in a void, outside the canon. *This article appears in the January 6, 2020, issue of New York Magazine. Beauford Delaney collection, Sc MG 59, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library Repository Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division Access to materials Some collections held by the Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture are held off-site and must be requested in advance. Please check the collection records in

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Portrait de Jean Genet, Beauford Delaney, 1972
Beauford Delaney was a painter, specializing in portraits. The Beauford Delaney collection consists of correspondence with colleagues, friends, gallery owners, and family members, as well as printed material documenting Delaney’s life in Paris.
BIOGRAPHICAL/HISTORICAL INFORMATION Beauford Delaney was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, the third child of the Reverend Samuel Delaney and Delia Johnson Delaney. He attended the Knoxville Colored School and later studied art with an elderly Knoxville artist, who encouraged him to get further training. In 1924 Delaney went to Boston where he studied at the Massachusetts Normal School and the South Boston School of Art, and attended evening classes at the Copley Society. Delaney went to New York in 1929, settling at first in Harlem. He painted society women and professional dancers at Billy Pierce’s dancing school on West 46th Street, which gained him a reputation as a portraitist. His first one-man show, which consisted of five pastels and ten charcoal drawings, was at the 135th Street Branch Library of the New York Public Library in 1930. During the same year three of his portraits were included in a group show at the Whitney Studio Galleries, the predecessor of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Delaney also taught part-time at a progressive school in Greenwich Village. By the late 1940s Beauford Delaney had become a significant figure on the art scene. He illustrated “Unsung Americans Sung” (1944), a book of black musical tributes edited by W.C. Handy; he had a series of one-man shows in New York and Washington, D.C.; and he exhibited in group shows in a number of other cities. In 1945 he showed his first series of portraits of writers Henry Miller and James Baldwin, who would become his lifelong friends. In 1949 he began an association with the Roko Gallery in New York, where he exhibited annually until 1953. In 1953 Delaney left New York with the intention of settling in Rome, but a visit to Paris turned into a permanent stay. He had two studios in Paris, the first in the suburbs of Clamart and the other in the Rue Vincingetorix. In Paris Delaney exhibited in one-man and group shows at the Gallerie Paul Fachetti (1960), the Centre Culturel Americain (1961 and 1972), the Galerie Lambert (1964), the Musee Galliera (1967) and the Galerie Darthea Speyer (1973), among other places. The latter was a major showing of a selection of his work from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s and the catalog contained tributes by James Jones, James Baldwin, and Georgia O’Keefe. Delaney also exhibited in England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the United States. The Paris years saw the creation of several masterpieces including portraits of singer Marian Anderson and writer Jean Genet. During this period he also created a series of interiors and studies in watercolor. After suffering two nervous breakdowns, Delaney was institutionalized, and died on March 26, 1979 at St. Ann’s Hospital in Paris. Delaney’s last one-man show in the United States was at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1978, inaugurating that museum’s Black Masters Series. Delaney’s work is in several private collections and in the collections of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Newark Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. SCOPE AND ARRANGEMENT The Beauford Delaney collection consists of correspondence with colleagues, friends, gallery owners, and family members, as well a printed material documenting Delaney’s life in Paris. Biographical information is provided in statements Delaney authored, articles prepared by others for catalogs, and his obituary. Among the many friends, colleagues and art collectors with whom he maintained an active correspondence is James Baldwin, who wrote an introduction to a catalog for an exhibition of Delaney’s art at Paris’ Galerie Lambert in 1964. Other correspondents include artists Charles Boggs, Al Hirschfeld, John Franklin Koenig, and Ellis Wilson, authors James Jones and Henry Miller (who was also a water colorist), art historian Richard A. Long, and his friend Lynn Stone. Additional artists, painters, writers, gallery owners and musicians who corresponded with Delaney include Lawrence Calcagno, Cab Calloway, Elaine DeKooning, Palmer C. Hayden, and Darthea Speyer. The letters discuss the style of painting of the correspondents, travels, purchase and exhibition of works, and personal matters. Numerous gallery announcements for art exhibits of Delaney’s and other artists’ works in Paris, New York and other cities demonstrate the extent of Delaney’s activities in the contemporary art world. The collection also contains a large number of picture postcards, some sent by friends, and gallery announcements. Family letters are from his brother and fellow artist, Joseph Delaney, and discuss his own work and impressions of Paris; his brother Emery (includes letters Delaney wrote to his brother, in addition to those received); and Delaney’s niece, Imogene.   Beauford Delaney
Jazz Banb 1963

Jazz Banb 1963

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery

All the Races, 1970

All the Races, 1970

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery

Price on Request
Bernard Hassell, 1961

Bernard Hassell, 1961

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery

Price on Request

Untitled: Abstract in Red, Blue, Yellow and…, 1956

Untitled: Abstract in Red, Blue, Yellow and…, 1956

Levis Fine Art

Price on Request Beauford Delaney

Untitled, 1956

Levis Fine Art

Price on Request
Mother’s Portrait (aka Portrait of Delia…, 1964

Mother’s Portrait (aka Portrait of Delia…, 1964

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery

Price on Request Beauford Delaney
Composition, 1963

Composition, 1963

Sale Date: February 6, 2021 Auction Closed
Self-portrait, 1964

Self-portrait, 1964

Sale Date: December 8, 2020 Auction Closed Beauford Delaney 
Street Scene, 1968

Street Scene, 1968

Sale Date: December 8, 2020 Auction Closed

SANS TITRE

Sale Date: July 9, 2020 Auction Closed Beauford Delaney 
SANS TITRE – 1960

SANS TITRE – 1960

Sale Date: July 9, 2020 Auction Closed
Composition, 1962

Composition, 1962

Sale Date: December 13, 2019 Auction Closed SOURCE OF ACQUISITION Donated by Daniel Richard in 1988. PROCESSING INFORMATION Compiled by Victor N. Smythe, 1998. Finding aid edited and adapted to digital form by Kay Menick in 2016. Paintings and art catalogs transferred to Art and Artifact Division. Photographs transferred to Photographs and Prints Division. KEY TERMS NAMES SUBJECTS

As President and CEO of Superstar Management since 1971, the first African-American in this field, Abdul-Jalil al-Hakim has a tremendous celebpro_logowealth of experience in all aspects of business and personal management, contract drafting and negotiations, and performed all arbitrations of salary grievances and contract disputes for all professional sports and entertainment clients with unprecedented legal and historical results. He negotiates and drafts all agreements for all publishing, merchandising and licensing; commercial advertisements and product endorsements; corporate sponsorships and affiliations; motion picture, television, radio and personal appearances. He was the first “SUPER AGENT“, CREATED the Profession of Sports/Music/Entertainment Branding, Marketing and Promoting, the African-American in the field and has taught and lectured Entertainment Law for 35 years. Many of the agents and lawyers in the business where instructed, consulted, influenced or inspired by his work….

Made “Law Review” TWICE with UNPRECEDENTED cases establishing NEW LAW; Sports/Music/Entertainment Talk Show Founder, Producer and Host, CSA; Expert and Guest Political/Legal/Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Analyst and Commentator; Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Law Lecturor/Presentor; Sports Color Commentator; His “The Stars” show was the FIRST Cable Business/Sports/Music/Entertainment Talk Show in 1973; OpEd Columnist/Journalist; Sports, Music, Entertainment and Variety Film, TV, Concert and Special Events Content Creator/Producer/Developer/Runner/Promoter; Islamic Dawah Lecturor/Presentor; His Computer Intelligence Company First and Only Minority Certified IBM, Apple, Compact, Microsoft Computer Value Added Dealer (1982); Computer Technology Lecturor/Presentor; MWBE Specialist.

December 2010 Relief Mission to Haiti


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December 2010 Haiti Relief Mission

Thank you in advance for your continued support and prayers and I hope this brief note finds you and yours in the best of health and spirits. The Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation with Stepping Together are planning a December Haitian Relief Mission and the dates have been finalized as November 30, 2010 to December 7, 2010! We will again be working with Arch Bishop Joel Jeune, one of the most powerful men in Haiti as head of the Catholic Church, and the people of Haiti that he serves at Grace Village, the compound of his organization Grace International, in the Carrefour district of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the epicenter of the earthquake.

As you know, the Village has become a refuge center, housing almost 30,000 quake victims and the compound is located precisely where the earthquake did the most damage. Most of the homes and neighborhoods surrounding Grace Village have been highly damaged, if not devastated, leaving hundreds of thousands of people dead and injured.
We will be working and living (in guest houses) on site, providing OBGYN care, possibly primary care (depending on staffing), health education and social support including mental health counseling. Our focus for OBGYN will be developing an ongoing clinic as there is a great need for prenatal services.
Supplies Needed for Haitian Mission
The following supplies are urgently needed for the Mission:
1. Portable Ultrasound Machine
2. Fetal Monitor
3. Laboratory Testing Equipment
a) Urinalysis kits
b) Glucometers with strips, lancets, alcohol swabs
c) Hemoglobin/hemotocrit
4. Fetoscopes (50)
5. Medicines: antibioticsanti-diabetics, antihypertensives, hormonal, prenatal vitamins, multivitamins, anesthetics, Insulin,
6. Condoms, contraceptive hormones, IUD
7. Blood pressure cuffs (100)
8. Patient gowns (1,000)
9. Gynecololgy Equipment
a) Speculums (100), assorted sizes
10. Laboratory Equipment: urinalysis, Glucometer (with strips, lancets, alcohol swabs), Hemaglobin/hematocrit, hemocult slides
11. Birth Control Supplies and Medicines: condoms, BCP, IUD, etc.
12. Biopsy equiptment: cervical biopsy, breast biopsy, etc.
13. Colposcopy, cryotherapy, LEEP machine
Also, we are looking for providers who are interested in teaching as this was an urgent request from our hosts but this is dependent on us hiring translators. As such we are looking for Kreyol-speaking nurses and providers to assist us. Currently there is an RN from New York City who is willing to attend however she is in need of financial assistance. This particular RN worked with us on previous mission and her help was invaluable. If you or anyone in your organization can fund her trip costs that would be fantastic.
Other services are dependent on getting sufficient volunteers. So spread the word, this mission is open to all volunteers but our capacity is limited and preference will be given to early responders. If they have not participated on one of our previous missions then they should send their CV and the completed Volunteer Waiver forms as soon as possible. The forms are available upon request.

I want to know if you are interested in participating with the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation and Dr. Kenya Numan with Stepping Together working to aid the people of Haiti, and if so, please send me your notice asap. I have attached herein below pictures of Dr. Numan during the Mission to Haiti July 24, 2010 to service the Arch Bishop at the Village and it was a great success for all that lead to this mission!There is much work to do and the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation with Stepping Together are committed and prepared to work with you and your organizations to raise funds and organize continued relief efforts to provide assistance to countries around the world, especially Africa, the Carribean and South/Central America.

We look forward to your response and “Thank you ALL” in advance.
Respectfully,
Abdul-Jalil



” The Man Who Turn$ Hit$ Into Million$”
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A & MWF and Stepping Together Help in Haiti, FREE Laser Cartridges


Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation
http://Superstarmanagement.com
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Abdul-Jalil on Twitter
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Join Superstars Entertainment and Sports Network
Abdul-Jalil’s “ooVoo” Video Chat Room and Messaging
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Articles on Abdul-Jalil
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Join Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation Mail List

On June 22, 2009 Abdul-Jalil sent a Tweet to Wyclef Jean informing him about the launch of Black Television News Channel, the only Afro-American 24/7 cable news network in late 2010 or early 2011and asked if he would like to attend the grand opening. Wyclef responded “I’m there!”. The tweet was as follows:
ajalil  “@wyclef 2 launch Black Television News Channel(BTNC) only Afro-American 24/7 cable news network n 2010. Join us http://www.btnc.tv/

*****

After the Haiti earthquake, on January 13, 2010 Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation announced via Twitter to Wyclef that we would partner with Stepping Together, the Surgery Planet, and others to provide resources for vehicles, manpower, supplies, donations, information, education, etc.
The tweet was as follows:
ajalil  “@ wyclef AMWFTrust.org partnering w/Stepping Together, Surgery Planet as resource 4 vehicle, manpower, supplies, donations, info, edu, etc
3:44 PM Jan 13th via TweetDeck”

*****

Later on January 13, 2010 Abdul-Jalil sent a Tweet to Wyclef asking for followers to donate to Wyclef’s Yele Haiti Fund.
The tweet was as follows:
ajalil  “Help Haiti survivors donate @wyclef online http://tinyurl.com/mmpyxr ..All $ go 2 Earthquake Relief Fund @yelehaiti http://bit.ly/7OOdBI
4:22 PM Jan 13th via TweetDeck”

*****

After January 20, 2010, in less than a week, we joined more than 136,000 ONE members around the world that took action to call for $1 billion in debt relief for Haiti. It soon became time to go more in-depth—on the crisis, the rebuilding, and the long-term development solutions.
We participated in an interactive conference call on Tuesday, January 26 at 8 PM (EST) to talk about Haiti and what we can do. On the call was Rep. Maxine Waters, a debt relief champion and driving force for legislative solutions; former Senate Majority Leader Dr. Bill Frist, a trained surgeon just returned from operating in a Haitian field hospital; Dr. Joia Mukherjee, medical director for Partners in Health, who is in Haiti right now; and David Meltzer, senior vice president for International Services for the American Red Cross, also just back from Haiti.
Everyone could RSVP with their phone number and ONE called you Tuesday at 8:00 PM—no phone number to remember!
http://www.one.org/us/actnow/drophaitiandebt/rsvp.html?id=1416-4212723-XIEm3Px&t=2

WHO: You, lots of other ONE members, Rep. Maxine Waters, former Senate Majority Leader Dr. Bill Frist, Dr. Joia Mukherjee from Partners in Health, David Meltzer from the Red Cross, and ONE’s President David Lane
WHAT: An interactive conference call on Haiti: Crisis, Rebuilding, and Debt Cancellation
WHEN: Tuesday, January 26 at 8:00 PM (EST)

The massive response to our “Drop Haiti’s Debt” campaign is already having an impact, with movement from both the IMF and World Bank to find ways to cancel Haiti’s debts. Efforts in both the House of Representatives and Senate to tackle this issue are promising, as well. But we need to keep the pressure up, and learn more about how we can help the Haitian people during this time of crisis and beyond.
Space was limited, but many did RSVP for this special call at:
http://www.one.org/us/actnow/drophaitiandebt/rsvp.html?id=1416-4212723-XIEm3Px&t=3
On the call, experts and observers shared their responses to the aftermath of last week’s earthquake. They also took questions, discuss the latest news on the “Drop Haiti’s Debt” campaign, and talked about the broader development picture and what more we can do to help the Haitian people rebuild and advance in the long-term.
It couldn’t have been easier to participate in the call—you didn’t even have to remember to dial in. RSVP and they called you on Tuesday night:
http://www.one.org/us/actnow/drophaitiandebt/rsvp.html?id=1416-4212723-XIEm3Px&t=4
In the wake of devastation comes the opportunity to rebuild, develop and strengthen. We didn’t miss our opportunity to learn the facts, help plan the future, and hear first-hand accounts of what’s going on in Haiti. We moved on that opportunity to serve those in need most!

*****

On July 17, 2010 Abdul-Jalil spoke with Lee Variety and the Honorable Johnny Ford, former Mayor for 24 years and member of the State House of Representatives of Tuskegee, Alabama who is the Founder, Secretary General of the World Conference of Mayors (WCM) and The National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM) regarding our working on behalf of the WCM and NCBM to aid the people of Haiti.
The World Conference of Mayors has over 18,000 mayors abroad, establishing partnerships with mayoral associations, presidents and heads of state in Africa, Colombia, China, Haiti, Brazil, Jamaica, Martinique and the Bahamas. The National Conference of Black Mayors assists more than 650 African American Mayors across the United States and the 48 million citizens that they collectively represent. The WCM has established the Haitian Disaster Relief Fund and been awarded Private Volunteer Organization (PVO) status and can now provide USAID assistance to countries around the world, especially Africa, and here in the United States with their own HIV/AIDS Initiative. They also have an affiliation with the National Medical Association and partnered with the Mars Corporation to donate a shipment of Uncle Ben’s Rice to Haitian member mayors’ communities, which in turn fed over 300,000 people in Haiti.

*****

On July 21, 2010 Abdul-Jalil spoke with Lee Variety and Arch Bishop Jeune, the most powerful man in Haiti as head of the Catholic Church, not one of the many alleged corrupt politicians there, regarding his prayer for a miracle to aid the people of Haiti that he serves at Grace Village, the compound of his organization Grace International, in the Carrefour district of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, the epicenter of the earthquake. Just three days later,  Dr. Kenya Numan and her organization “Stepping Together” was with her crew on the ground in Haiti July 24, 2010 communicating with the Arch Bishop and at the Village by July 26, 2010!
The Village has become a refuge center, housing almost 30,000 quake victims and the compound is located precisely where the earthquake did the most damage. Most of the homes and neighborhoods surrounding Grace Village have been highly damaged, if not devastated, leaving hundreds of thousands of people dead and injured.

*****

On August 12, 2010 Abdul-Jalil received a letter of “Thanks” from the Honorable Johnny Ford acknowledging an eternal debt of gratitude to the Aaron and Margaret Wallace Foundation and Stepping Together for the incredible and expedient work of arranging the Haitian relief effort with Dr. Kenya Numan to Grace Village with the Herculean effort to rearrange the logistics to reroute the mission to the Village for people in such great need! This was a tangible reality of SUCCESS in Haiti for ALL the members of the organizations world-wide rather than the many idle cocktail party rants and raves of projects that exist without any substance behind them. WE DID IT! ALL the members of the World Conference of Mayors can celebrate their success and acknowledge their contribution. You can view and/or download that letter here.
Dr. Kenya Numan gave her assessment of the Haitian Relief Effort to Grace Village as follows:

I want to let you know that I have returned from Haiti. While there I had a very good meeting at Grace International Ministries with Archbishop Jeune et al; this included a tour of their facilities. They are doing great work for the Haitian people and we would like to support them in an ongoing basis.

We are planning to return to Haiti specifically to provide an outpatient OBGYN clinic to the residents of Grace Village as well as Health Education. We are now in the planning process to make this happen successfully.

However while there I was able to assess some of their most urgent needs. Currently their three priorities for the Village are:
1. Tools: construction, cleaning: a sustaining effort so they can keep the village clean and respectable
2. Education & training: a sustainable effort in regards to health, job, etc.
3. Healthcare: a sustaining effort with monthly providers coming on an ongoing basis.

As you can see this will be quite an undertaking but my organization is committed to see this through the next 10-20 years or whatever it takes to get the job done.

I look forward to speaking with you in detail regarding this effort and how best to strategize for support from the USA, Congress, White house, etc. Please let me know what is the best number to reach you.

Peace and blessings,

Kenya

*****

On August 25, 2010 Abdul-Jalil received the letter shown below of “Thanks” from Arch Bishop Joel Jeune of Grace Village in Haiti for the Relief Mission they received from the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation with Stepping Together on behalf of The World Conference of Mayors (WCM) and The National Conference of Black Mayors (NCBM). This is a tangible reality of SUCCESS in Haiti for ALL the members of the organizations world-wide rather than the many idle cocktail party rants and raves of projects that exist without any substance behind them. WE DID IT! ALL the members of the World Conference of Mayors can celebrate their success and acknowledge their contribution. Let us get that membership list updated and dispatch the letter to them all to use as a tool for their own marketing, promotional and fundraising efforts.
We are now moving forward in a meaningful way to secure financial, subsistence, construction and medical aid and support for the next mission which will take place as soon as we can unite to raise the necessary items just mentioned. If we can tap into the resources of the USAIDS and the National Medical Association we can make great progress in securing bi-weekly missions to various needed areas around the World! Let us move forward!
We are committed and prepared to work with the WCM and NCBM organizations to raise funds, provide support and organize continued relief efforts for financial donations, to deliver much needed medical support and supplies; food; clothing; educational materials; construction support and building materials; much needed personal items; and legal assistance for displaced children from orphanages that were given transportation and temporary housing in the United States with other families, churches, and organizations until homes have been rebuilt to house them. Where most relief efforts are limited, if not stopped altogether by current travel restrictions in, within, and out of Haiti, The World Conference of Mayors has some political cache that it can exercise to further achieve our united goals globally. This could be the first step toward fulfilling several of our conversations of our organization providing relief support to your efforts globally.
Additionally, in relations to our working together on relief missions here in America and globally, Abdul-Jalil is exploring the possibility of a telethon, perhaps with J. C. Watts Black Television News Channel (BTNC). To that end the WCM is prepared to provide it’s full support to your and our joint efforts to overcome the continual need for financial assistance to achieve our goals. These fundraising efforts include the proposed telethon as a measure to not only raise funds but to raise awareness for the causes as well. Now let us move forward with these joint and several fundraising efforts with a goal of working together on projects of mutual interest and support in a spirit of oneness.
Again, there is much work to do and the Aaron & Margaret Wallace Foundation with Stepping Together are committed and prepared to work with you and your organizations to raise funds and organize continued relief efforts to provide assistance to countries around the world, especially Africa, the Caribbean and South/Central America.
Thank you all again for allowing us to helping your efforts in Haiti and I look forward to many more successful efforts globally!
Respectfully,
Abdul-Jalil
President
Page One of Letter

Page Two of Letter

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